Welcome to a fancifully random collection of visuals and text.

 

Photography has very little to do with mastering all the knobs and dials on your DSLR and everything to do with learning to look, really look, and get beyond the endless collections of different objects and people.

spellingmistakescostlives:

I’ve always been obsessed by cross-section illustrations and the idea of dying in space so this was a perfect match. You can get this as a t-shirt or a print

spellingmistakescostlives:

I’ve always been obsessed by cross-section illustrations and the idea of dying in space so this was a perfect match. You can get this as a t-shirt or a print

For me, when brands and products speak, when you reach out and try to communicate, the most important thing—and you guys probably throw this around all the time—is authenticity," he said. "Tell me the truth. Make my life more interesting, better, more entertaining, richer. Or just leave me the fuck alone. And if you can’t do that, then advertising should at least be really beautiful. But offer something, you know?

Jared Leto, on brands and advertising.

(Source: adweek.com)

Creative people are confident in only one thing: their own doubt. I think there’s a huge lack of self-confidence in a creative person because, by nature, the definition of a creative person is someone who is trying to make something new. They know, if they are professional creatives, that the likelihood of doing that—making something new and significant—is hugely unlikely, so they build within that city of doubt. From doubt, they get to iterate and work extremely hard, hoping to find something new; it’s all about hope. I’ve never met anyone who is good at what they do creatively and is super-confident. Maybe they pretend to be confident in front of their agent or the media, but I’ve never been confident in that way.

A conversation with the inimitable John Maeda. Complement with Seth Godin on dancing with self-doubt and Anna Deavere Smith’s advice to artists on what self-esteem really means.  (via explore-blog)

explore-blog:

The best explanation of net neutrality and why it matters, ever, period. 

There are three points of view from which a writer can be considered: he may be considered as a storyteller, as a teacher, and as an enchanter. A major writer combines these three — storyteller, teacher, enchanter — but it is the enchanter in him that predominates and makes him a major writer.

To the storyteller we turn for entertainment, for mental excitement of the simplest kind, for emotional participation, for the pleasure of traveling in some remote region in space or time. A slightly different though not necessarily higher mind looks for the teacher in the writer. Propagandist, moralist, prophet — this is the rising sequence. We may go to the teacher not only for moral education but also for direct knowledge, for simple facts… Finally, and above all, a great writer is always a great enchanter, and it is here that we come to the really exciting part when we try to grasp the individual magic of his genius and to study the style, the imagery, the pattern of his novels or poems.

The three facets of the great writer — magic, story, lesson — are prone to blend in one impression of unified and unique radiance, since the magic of art may be present in the very bones of the story, in the very marrow of thought. There are masterpieces of dry, limpid, organized thought which provoke in us an artistic quiver quite as strongly as a novel like Mansfield Park does or as any rich flow of Dickensian sensual imagery. It seems to me that a good formula to test the quality of a novel is, in the long run, a merging of the precision of poetry and the intuition of science. In order to bask in that magic a wise reader reads the book of genius not with his heart, not so much with his brain, but with his spine. It is there that occurs the telltale tingle even though we must keep a little aloof, a little detached when reading. Then with a pleasure which is both sensual and intellectual we shall watch the artist build his castle of cards and watch the castle of cards become a castle of beautiful steel and glass.

Vladimir Nabokov

(Source: brainpickings.org)

photojojo:

Ghost Photographs is quickly becoming one of our new favorite Tumblogs. 

Artist Angela Deane collects random vintage photographs and transforms the subjects into anonymous white ghosts. 

Vintage Photos Meet Painting in Ghost Photographs

via Junk Culture

There is something in us, as storytellers and as listeners to stories, that demands the redemptive act, that demands that what falls at least be offered the chance to be restored.